Printmaking process and effect

 

 

please click on the images or artists' names below to see more prints, their printmaking process, photographs and biographies of the artists

BRUNO BOBAK

Bruno Bobak, Old Arts Building University of NB, silkscreen, 13 x 20 in.

OLD ARTS BUILDING, UNIVERSITY OF NEW BRUNSWICK
serigraph
13 x 20 in.
edition 4/100
framed dimension: 19.5 x 26.5 in.





Bruno Bobak, Lovers, engraving

LOVERS
engraving
3 x 3.5 in.
edition 50/50
framed dimension: 16.5 x 13.5 in.
SOLD

 

 

Bruno Bobak, Sow, etching

SOW
engraving
3.5 x 3 in.
edition 1/1 Bon A Tirer
framed dimension: 10.75 x 9.75 in.



 

 

What are Limited Edition Prints or Original Multiples?

Limited Edition Prints or Original Multiples are original works of art. They are different from paintings or drawings, because of the way they are made. Where a painting is unique because the artist has actually put the paintbrush on the surface in front of you, a limited edition print or original multiple is a printed impression of a conceived image made on another surface called a plate (which can be metal, stone, screen, block, plexi or another medium). Each print in the edition is considered an original. There are many ways to make the impression (which you will see in this exhibition) but in general, ink or paint is transferred from the plate to a porous surface (usually paper or textile.) Because the plate can be reused, multiple impressions can be made. The artist decides how many prints will be made within the edition. This number is based on several considerations including the artist’s expectations from the plate. Since a plate is delicate, there are only so many prints that can be made before the plate degenerates and the results become unpredictable. The artist works diligently to ensure that all prints in the edition are the same high quality. Direct comparison of impressions from the same edition will reveal small, almost imperceptible differences that render each print a unique work of art. In the case of V.E. (or variable edition) prints, the artist may actually purposely vary the strength of the colour and contrast between prints.


In this example, Bruno Bobak created a print entitled Burnt Stumps.
The artist decided that it would be an edition of 30. This example is impression number 5 from that edition.

 Once the entire edition is printed, the artist will usually score across or punch a hole through the plate, ending that edition. This is known as striking the plate and ensures that no future prints will be made and that the edition is indeed ‘limited’.   Once the edition is completed, the artist then removes the plate from circulation. Some artists frame the plate with the last print in the series as a momento – as long as no further printings are possible.
The artist is responsible for keeping track of the number of prints within any edition which is usually done with an edition record. This record indicates the date and place of printing, the artist, title of work, paper used, edition size, the type of ink used and whether or not there exists a Bon a Tirer and Artists Proofs. 

The artist will make a few Artists Proofs to ensure that the plate looks as intended. The printmaker (who is often, though not always the artist) will also pull a "Bon a Tirer".  This print is used as the standard for the edition meaning that all the prints will be measured against this one. The number of Artist’s Proofs is usually around 10% of the total edition. Instead of a fraction as in the above example the print is marked A.P. (for ‘Artist’s Proof’, or sometimes M.P. for ‘Master Proof’, E.A. for ‘Epreuve Artist(e)’ or other such variant.) The number of proofs is not included in the total number in the edition.

What about reproductions?

Prints have become a misunderstood and mistrusted art form recently due to the confusion over reproductions and original prints.  A reproduction, although often called a print, is actually quite different. It is a copy of a work of art conceived by the artist in another medium such as an oil painting or watercolour that has been mechanically photo-reproduced. It can be signed and numbered, as original prints are, but invariably with a much larger number (250 - 1000 or more) in the edition.  Numbering and signing a reproduction does not change its essence; it is still a reproduction of a painting and not an original print.


 

 

DAVID BLACKWOOD


David Blackwood, The Flora Nickerson in the Labrador Sea, 16 x 23 in. etching

THE FLORA NICKERSON IN THE LABRADOR SEA (1982)
etching and aquatint on wove paper
edition 12/50
16 x 23 in.
framed dimension: 21 x 28 in.

To watch a beautiful video by Tony Ianzelo & Andy Thomson from the National Film Board

about David Blackwood, his process and inspiration, please click on this link:
BLACKWOOD 

Printmaking exhibition 2012, installed



 

 

RON BOLT

Ron Bolt, Wave at Dawning

WAVE AT DAWNING (1997)
serigraph, edition A/P 11/20
25 x 28 in.
framed dimension: 31 x 34 in.

2012 Printmaking exhibition, installed



 

 

MARGOT CORMIER SPLANE

Margot Cormier Splane - Nature Abhors a Vacuum

NATURE ABHORS A VACUUM
serigraph
edition 9/51 (from 24 stencils)
12 x 19 in.
framed dimension: 18 x 25 in.

ARTIST STATEMENT (Nature Abhors a Vacuum)

The ancient Greek philosopher Aristotle is credited with being the first person to coin the phrase “Nature Abhors a Vacuum”. It means that if a space or niche becomes empty, something will move in to fill the gap. I am just having a little fun by taking an alternate interpretation on the word vacuum, with the wolf clearly showing his contempt.

Margot Cormier Splane, The Politician

THE POLITICIAN
serigraph
edition 6/60 (from 16 stencils)
5 x 6 in.
framed dimension: 10 x 12 in.

Silkscreen Printing originally appeared in China about 1,000 years ago. It became widely used in North America for industrial purposes.  In the 1930’s artists adopted the process and renamed it serigraph printing to distinguish the creation of a work of art on paper from silkscreen’s industrial use.



 

 

LIONEL CORMIER

Lionel Cormier, Manhatten, lithograph and watercolour

MANHATTEN
lithograph and watercolour
6.5 x 8.75 in.
edition E/A
unframed

 

Lionel Cormier, Arbres, lithograph and watercolour

ARBRES
lithograph and watercolour
9.75 x 12 in.
edition of 5
unframed


 

 


 

John K. Esler, The Last Flight, etching

THE LAST FLIGHT (1976)
serigraph, edition A/P
24 x 17 in.
framed dimension: 32 x 24 in.



 

 

 

 

 


William Forrestall, For George and Chris, intaglio etching

FOR GEORGE AND CHRIS
etching, intaglio
6 x 7.75 in.
framed dimension: 17 x 21 in.

 

William Forrestall, For Tom and Ester

FOR TOM AND ESTER
etching, intaglio
6 x 7.75 in.
framed dimension: 17 x 21 in.

 

 


Paul Healey, Summer, drypoint, V.E.

SUMMER (2009)
dry point, intaglio
edition 1/10 V.E.
6 x 9 in.
exhibition frame

 

Paul Healey, Spring Bees, monotype

SPRING BEES (2012)
monotype
edition 1/1
8 x 10.5 in.
exhibition frame
SOLD

Paul Healey, Spring

SPRING (2012)
dry point, intaglio
edition 3/4 V.E.
3 x 2.5 in.
exhibition frame


 


Paul Healey, Fredericton Evening, dry point

FREDERICTON EVENING (2012)
dry point, intaglio
edition 1/4 V.E.
3 x 5 in.
unframed

 

 

 

WHAT IS DRY POINT?
Dry point is an intaglio process, a variant of engraving, where the artist incises directly into the plate, which can be copper, acetate, zinc, or Plexiglas, with a hard point “needle” of sharp metal or diamond point. This “needle” tool distinguishes a dry point from an engraving where the artist uses a “burin” to incise into the plate.

WHAT IS INTAGLIO?
Intaglio is a collective name for the process of printing from an image incised directly into a plate. In the intaglio process, the entire plate is covered with colour (usually ink) and then wiped clean however the ink remains in the incisions. The plate is then pressed against paper with great pressure and the image is printed wherever the incisions have trapped the ink.

DANIELLE HOGAN

 


Danielle Hogan, Cherry Loops, silkscreen, 30 x 22 in.

CHERRY LOOPS, 2003
serigraph
30 x 22 in.
edition 6/12
unframed

 

Danielle Hogan, Sour Apple Twist, silkscreen, 30 x 22 in.

SOUR APPLE TWIST, 2003
serigraph
30 x 22 in.
edition 10/12
framed dimension: 34 x 26 in.

 

 

CHARLOTTE JONES

Jullyb

WATT'S POINT, BURNT CAPE
Japanese woodblock prints
7.5 x 5.5 in.
full length: 4 ft.
SOLD
contains 9 original prints
Letterpress and binding by Tara Bryan.

The limestone barrens of the Great Northern Peninsula of Newfoundland support an incredible number of small, intricate flowers, some so rare that they are only found in these locations. What intrigues me is the diversity of flora in these harsh, windswept environments and their survival instincts, their adaptations that they make in order to survive. They are examples of the truly creative: adversity overcoming hardship. The three books I have created contain woodblock images of flowers that were spotted on three walks--July 2, 2007; July 10, 2007 and July 21, 2002--in four locations: Burnt Cape, Watt’s Point, the Port au Port Peninsula and Cape Norman.

Some of the flowers are rare and some fairly common–it is a random sampling. I use the accordion book format to recreate the experience of lying on the ground and making these wonderful miniature discoveries.  By the same token both the accordion book format and my concern with nature and site emanate from the tradition of Japanese woodblock and such ukiyo-e masters as Utamaro, Hokusai and Hiroshige.

Charlotte Jones

Orange Hawkweed, japanese woodblock, 6.5 x 9.5in.

ORANGE HAWKWEED
Japanese woodblock
6.5 x 9.5 in.
framed dimension: 15 x 18 in.



Charlotte Jones, Unsent Letter #1: Elbaite, 2011, Japanese woodblock, framed

UNSENT LETTER #1: ELBAITE
Japanese woodblock
edition A/P
7 x 7 in.
framed dimension: 13 x 13 in.

 

 

 

Charlotte Jones, Unsent Letter #7: Ruby, 2011, Japanese woodblock, framed

UNSENT LETTER #7: RUBY
Japanese woodblock
edition A/P
7 x 7 in.
framed dimension: 13 x 13 in.

 

Charlotte Jones, Unsent Letter #3: Tanzanite, 2011, Japanese woodblock, framed

UNSENT LETTER #3: TANZANITE
Japanese woodblock
edition A/P
7 x 7 in.
framed dimension: 13 x 13 in.

 

 

 Colours of love: Unsent Letters

These are the first images in a collaborative project with St. John’s writer, Carmelita McGrath.
It began with a discussion about motherly love when both our daughters headed off on their own to their respective universities and grew into a greater exploration of love— love lost, gained, passionate love and so on. Carmelita’s poems are filled with colour and were an inspiration for me to play with emotive aspects of colour based on the facets of gemstones and the facets of love.

Charlotte Jones, 2011


 

 

CHRISTINE KOCH


Christine Koch, Across the Sound III (Bylot Island), VE Variant IV Blue

ACROSS THE SOUND III (BYLOT ISLAND)
mixed media with linocut
VE Variant 1V (blue), edition 199/200
11 x 25.5 in
matted

 

Christine Koch, Across the Sound III, VE Variant IV (black)

ACROSS THE SOUND III (BYLOT ISLAND)
mixed media with linocut
VE Variant 1V (black), edition 178/200
11 x 25.5 in
framed dimension: 20 x 34 in.





Christine Koch, Source, 1994, linocut

SOURCE, 1994
linocut
edition 14/20
5.75 x 7.75 in.
framed dimension: 13 x 14 in.

 

 

Christine Koch, Tesserae: Still Life Fragments VII, linocut collage, 6.5 x 8.25 in.

TESSERAE: STILL LIFE FRAGMENTS VII, 1997
linocut collage
6.5 x 8.25 in.
framed dimension: 14.75 x 15.75 in.

 

 


Monica Lacey, Greek Church, Manitoba, photo-etching

GREEK CHURCH, MANITOBA (2011)
photo-etching on BFK Rives paper
edition 4/7
5 x 7 in. plate
framed dimension: 12.25 x 14 in.

 

 

Monica Lacey, Driftwood, photo-etching

DRIFTWOOD (2011)
photo-etching on BFK Rives paper
edition 5/8
5 x 7 in. plate
framed dimension: 12.25 x 14 in.



 

 

Gallery 78 Printmaking Exhibition, installed

Monica Lacey, untitled, encaustic on hand-coloured photo-etching on Somerset paper

UNTITLED
encaustic on hand-coloured photo-etching on Somerset paper
mounted on birch panel
5 x 5 in.
unframed
SOLD


 

 


 


Vicki MacLean, House Next Door

HOUSE NEXT DOOR
etching
edition of 60
4 x 5 in.
framed dimension: 10 x 12 in.

 

Vicki MacLean, Birds in Winter 1

BIRDS IN WINTER 1
etching
edition of 60
3 in. diameter
unframed

 

 

Colts, etching, 7 x 4.5 in.

COLTS
etching
edition of 60
7 x 4.5 in.
framed dimension: 11.5 x 9.5 in.

Vicki MacLean, Pony

PONY
etching
edition 19/80
3.5 x 4.5 in.
available framed or unframed

 

 

Jumping jacks, etching, 4 x 8.5 in.

JUMPING JACKS
etching
edition of 60
4 x 8.5 in.
framed dimension: 12 x 14 in.


 

 

ANN MANUEL

Ann Manuel, The Old Train Station, monotype with chine collé, 24 x 17.5 in.

THE OLD TRAIN STATION (2011)
monotype with chine collé
including an etching and note by Monica Lacey
24 x 17.5 in.
framed dimension: 31.75 x 25.25 in.

Ann Manuel, Portrait of an artist

PORTRAIT OF AN ARTIST (2011)
lift drawing and photo transfer on mylar
13 x 16 in.
framed dimension: 22 x 24.5 in.

 

Ann Manuel, Trio, monotype with chine collé

TRIO (2004)
monotype with chine collé
24.5 x 19.5 in.
framed dimension: 35 x 28 in.

 

2012 Printmaking exhibition, installed


 

 

TESSA MAY

Tessa May, A String of Boats, etching

A STRING OF BOATS
etching
edition 9/80 VE
4 x 16.75 in.
framed dimension: 11 x 24 in.

Tessa May's studios (what an inspirational view!)

 

Tessa May, The View from my Deck, etching

THE VIEW FROM MY DECK
etching
edition 36/80 VE
2 x 22.75 in.
framed dimension: 10 x 31 in.

 


 

 


Paul Miller, untitled, etching

UNTITLED (2002)
etching
edition 9/15
11.75 x 11.75 in.
framed dimension: 18 x 18 in.


 

Paul Miller, Untitled, etching, 11.75 x 11.75 in.

UNTITLED (2002)
etching
edition 7/15
11.5 x 11.5 in.
framed dimension: 18 x 18 in.

 

 


 

Toni Onley, Winter Cove, Coast Suite, silkscreen, edition 22/32

WINTER COVE/COAST SUITE (1981)
serigraph
edition 22/32
10.75 x 14.75 in.
framed dimension: 20 x 24 in.

 

Toni Onley, Silent Two

SILENT TWO
etching and aquatint
edition: A/P
9.5 x 12 in.
framed dimension: 22.75 x 19.5 in.




 

 

 

 

 


 

 


Susan Paterson, Poinsettia

POINSETTIA
hand painted etching
edition 32/60
4.25 x 5.25 in.
framed dimension: 13 x 14 in.


 

Susan Paterson, Winter Sunset

WINTER SUNSET
hand painted etching
edition 28/50
14.25 x 12 in.
framed dimension: 22 x 20.5 in.

 

 

 

Susan Paterson, Pulling a Proof


 

 


Joseph Plaskett, Still Life with Garlic, etching

STILL LIFE WITH GARLIC (1999)
etching, ed. 43/99
6.5 x 8 in.
framed dimension: 14.75 x 14 in.

 

Joseph Plaskett, The Yellow Rose, etching

THE YELLOW ROSE (1999)
etching, ed. 43/99
7 x 9 in.
framed dimension: 20.5 x 16.5 in.



 

 


 

 

William Ritchie, Luma, Labrador Mythology Series (1981)

LUMA, LABRADOR MYTHOLOGY SERIES (1981)
lithograph, edition 14/15
14.5 x 18 in.
framed dimension: 21 x 24 in.

 


 

 


 

 

David Silverberg, Spider Flowers

SPIDER FLOWERS
coloured engraving
edition: artist's proof
13 in. diameter.
framed dimension: 19.25 x 19.25 in.

 

David Silverberg, Orkney Trombones

ORKNEY TROMBONES
coloured engraving
edition:1/50
10.75 x 22.75 in.
framed dimension: 19 x 31.5 in.

David Silverberg, Consuelo Naomi

CONSUELO NAOMI
coloured engraving
edition: épreuve d'artiste / artist's proof
9.25 in. diameter.
unframed


 

 

 

GORDON SMITH

Gordon Smith, Combe Rocks, serigraph, 11/35

COMBE ROCKS (1989)
serigraph
edition 11/35
19 x 19 in.
framed dimension: 25 x 25 in.


 

 

 

DAN STEEVES

 


 

Dan Steeves, Crosses We Bear, etching, 1990

CROSSES WE BEAR (1990)
etching, edition 18/18
17 x 23.75 in.
unframed

Dan Steeves, Her Works Bring Her Praise, etching

HER WORKS BRING HER PRAISE (1990)
etching, edition 2/15
23.5 x 15.5 in.
unframed

 

 

 

 

 

 

ANNA SYPEREK

 


 

 

Anna Syperek during the last stages of printing "Buddy's Point"

ANNA SYPEREK showing us the last stage of printing the etching "Buddy's Point"

Anna Syperek, Buddy's Point, etching

BUDDY'S POINT (2011)
etching and chine collé
10.5 x 24 in.
edition 10/50
framed dimension: 17x 31 in.



 

 

Anna Syperek, Twilight, etching

TWILIGHT (2010)
etching
15 x 12 in.
edition 27/35
framed dimension: 24 x 20 in.
SOLD

 

Anna Syperek, Anghiari, Tuscany

ANGHIARI, TUSCANY (2009)
etching
9.5 x 7 in.
edition 21/50
framed dimension: 21 x 17 in.




 

 

TAKAO TANABE

Takao Tanabe, Yellow Field, lithograph, edition 39/75

YELLOW FIELD (undated)
lithograph, edition 39/75
22 x 30 in.
framed dimension: 28 x 36 in.

 


 

 

BRIGID TOOLE GRANT

Brigid Toole Grant, Security is not Peace, woodcut

SECURITY IS NOT PEACE
woodcut
edition A/P
20 x 27.5 in.
framed



MIDWINTER
woodcut
edition 23/75
10 x 7.5 in.
framed dimension: 16 x 12 in.

 

 

CELEBRATION!
woodcut
edition 31/75
10 x 7.5 in.
framed dimension: 16 x 12 in.


 

 


 

Robert Van de Peer, Tongue Shoal Lighthouse - Burning

TONGUE SHOAL LIGHTHOUSE - BURNING (2007)
etching, edition 3/3 VE
18 x 24 in.
framed dimension: 24 x 30 in.

 

Thank you to volunteer-based CHCT-TV, one of seven independent community television stations licensed in Canada to broadcast public access programming,

for an engaging, informative video about

Robert Van de Peer, Master Printmaker 

 

Robert Van de Peer, Whitstable Storm, etching

WHITSTABLE STORM (2005)
etching, edition 4/10
6 x 8 in.
framed dimension: 16 x 18 in.

 

Robert Van de Peer, Arab Show - Red Sea Storm, etching

ARAB DHOW - RED SEA STORM (2008)
etching, edition 3/3
18 x 24 in.
framed dimension: 24 x 30 in.

 

Printmaking exhibition installed

 

 

 

 

 


 

Alison Willms, Christening, monotype, 2011

CHRISTENING (2011)
monotype
25.5 x 21 in.
framed dimension: 34.75 x 28 in.
SOLD

 

 

 

Alison Willms, Falling I, monotype with chine collé, 2011

FALLING I (2011)
monotype with chine collé
10 x 9.75 in.
framed dimension: 18.5 x 17 in.


 

Alison Willms, Falling II, monotype, 9.75 x 9.75 in.

FALLING II (2011)
monotype
9.75 x 9.75 in.
framed dimension: 18.5 x 17 in.

 

 


 

 

Francis Wishart, Untitled, Provence, monotype, 15.5 x 11.75 in.

ST. ESTEVE, FRANCE (2010)
monotype
15.5 x 11.75 in.
framed dimension: 20 x 16.25 in.

WHAT IS MONOTYPE?

Monotype, strictly speaking, is a printing technique. But, unlike any of the intaglio methods, the monotype plate has no permanent marks and therefore there is only ever one version of each image (in intaglio there can be many – 50 or more depending on various factors).

The artist paints an image directly onto the plate (in Francis' case, a zinc plate). Using an oil-based printer's ink that dries slowly, the artist can make smudges, blur colours, emphasize elements and work with the colour on the surface. The plate is then put through a press and printed on paper. This process is very close to painting with the extra step creating a mirror image of the painting on the plate.

Artists, who might otherwise paint directly onto paper or canvas, choose this technique since the mirror effect and the slight uncertainty of the printing method introduce an element of chance and play into the artwork's creation. There are many errors and accidents, thus each successful monotype is the survivor of a gauntlet of artistic challenge and rigour. The great monotype artist is one who can control and predict the accident and engage with its possibilities.

The resulting image is different from any other media – there is a flattening of space and a refulgent ghostliness that can turn perfectly banal scenes into surreal experiments in light. Monotypes capture fleeting fragility with bold colours and they tolerate, even need , deep consideration– they are not for those seeking instant gratification from their art. A good monotype will develop slowly under your gaze, each new look at the work will reveal something new as silently as sunlight slipping through the trees.

 

Francis Wishart, Quimper Vase, monotype, 14.75 x 14.75 in.

QUIMPER VASE (2010)
monotype
14.75 x 14.75 in.
framed dimension: 19.75 x 19.75 in.

 


Francis Wishart, Reflection, 2011, monotype

REFLECTION (2011)
monotype
11.75 x 7.75 in.
framed dimension: 16.5 x 12.5 in.

 


 

Francis Wishart, Three Trees, 2011, monotype

THREE TREES (2011)
monotype
11.75 x 7.75 in.
framed dimension: 16.5 x 12.5 in.